Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University

  • Diana Benino
  • Antonia Girardi
  • Petra Czarniak

Abstract

Objectives: To examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy course at an Australian University.

Methods: The University uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. Data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online.

Results: Descriptive statistics support that, from a student's perspective, partial online delivery is the preferred teaching methodology for an introductory pharmaceutical practice unit.

Conclusion: This study has served to highlight that while there are a few points of significant difference between traditional and online teaching and learning, a combination of the two provides a reasonable avenue for teaching exploration. This result has implications for teaching practice generally, and within the pharmacy discipline, specifically.

 

Keywords: Education, Pharmacy. Education, Distance. Computer-Assisted Instruction. Australia.

 

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Published
2011-12-12
How to Cite
1.
Benino D, Girardi A, Czarniak P. Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University. Pharm Pract (Granada) [Internet]. 2011Dec.12 [cited 2019Jul.23];9(4):252-9. Available from: https://pharmacypractice.org/journal/index.php/pp/article/view/57
Section
Original Research